"Croak" by Hannah Yerington



I want to be where I am going,

the forest of purple pop-ups, my dog breathing out heavy summer,

his small legs trotting with purpose and misplaced grace,

where there are bookshelves built into the trees,


There is a poem in my body, and it isn’t mourning,

it is a tune I like humming, sun thick honey, blackberry fingers,


I want to go where I am going,

where the frogs play fiddle, crane bill geranium hats bobbing,

the lupine holding court among the cicadas,

the return of my littlest self,

a yellow paper crown and a wet body,


I know where I am going

and I know it is good,

tealights floating down the bayou at night,

log alligators moving me between water moss, and mess,

I keep a notebook by the bog,

unlined, pocket sized, the perfect shape for wonder,

to read by flame and firefly,


I know where I am going,

where I am going is good,

the place where teacups fill with mud water, dirt kitchen,

my pockets fill with pen and purple flower,

the pace set by peony and prose,


I sit in the mosquito-stream

spit up swamp water and tree snot,

I shed dead skin and frog song,


Listen, where I am going,

I will know when I am gone.




Hannah Yerington (she/her) is a poet, a Jewish Arts educator, and the director of the Bolinas Poetry Camp for Girls. Her work has been published in Nixes Mates, Onley, and Ample Remains, among others. She runs the Bolinas Poetry Camp for Girls and is an MFA candidate at Bowling Green State University. She writes about many things including talking flowers, post-memory, and sometimes seals.


Instagram & Twitter: @hannahyerington

Website: www.hannahyeringtonwriting.com


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